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Metacarpal Bossing

Metacarpal Bossing is a small, immovable mass of bone that is usually found at the base of the 2nd and 3rd metacarpal bones where they meet the small bones of the wrist. This condition can result in sensitivity in the immediate area and/or an unsightly bulge on the back of the hand. In most cases, the boss does not result in any injury or further problems, but in some cases, the patient may feel pain, aching, or even possibly a slight lack of mobility in the wrist joint.

Often, this condition will be mistaken for a ganglion cyst due to its location and external appearance.

A carpometacarpal bossing may exist from birth or may be the result of a trauma or injury in the affected area. There are also indications that those with careers involving repetitive movements in the hands and fingers may develop this condition. Typically, this condition will begin to show itself in the 3rd or 4th decade.

What is the treatment of carpal bossing?

Most often, carpal bossing is a problem that can simply be watched, with no specific treatment. In cases where the condition is causing significant symptoms, a surgical procedure to remove the excess bone can be performed. There are conflicting reports in the literature as to how likely it may be that the bump returns after excision, but it is possible.